Author Archives: Megan

Autumn Apple Crisp (vegan)

Autumn Apple Crisp

You know how Christmas smells like pine trees? Well in my house, autumn has a smell too. Apple crisp. Baking this recipe on a brisk, sunny day, burnt-orange leaves falling past the windows, the aroma of cinnamon and apples wafting from the oven, there is a fleeting moment when I feel just like Martha Stewart. Of course I have to take care to keep my eyes tightly closed so I can’t see the curtains that need hemming and the floors that need scrubbing, but the moment is lovely while it lasts. Try this easy recipe and you too can have a home that smells like Martha Stewart’s. When the feeling passes – it always does – you can indulge in a bowl of scrumptious apple crisp to ease your disappointment!

The recipe that follows is my clean, vegan version of a buttery old favorite. Your mouth won’t know the difference but your body will thank you. Brad had been eating the old version for years before I switched things up and he never even noticed a change. There’s still plenty of sugar and fat in this dessert, but it’s entirely plant-based and whole grain.

Autumn Apple Crisp (vegan)

  • 4 heaping C sliced, peeled apples *use Gala, Macoun, or another variety that is firm and tart
  • 1 tsp brown sugar plus 1 1/2 C packed brown sugar
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 C spelt flour *use whole wheat flour if you can’t find spelt flour
  • 1 C old-fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/8 C chia seeds
  • pinch of fine sea salt
  • 1 1/2 tsp grated nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/3 C coconut oil
  • 1/3 C non-hydrogenated vegan margarine

TIP: You will need 6-8 apples to produce 4 heaping cups of thin apple slices. Use an old-fashioned, hand-crank apple peeler/corer/slicer to make quick work of it.

  1. preheat the oven to 375 degrees F
  2. combine the apple slices with 1 tsp brown sugar and the lemon juice in the bottom of a 9×12 glass baking dish
  3. in a large bowl, mix together the rest of the brown sugar with all the dry ingredients
  4. add the coconut oil and margarine to the dry ingredients and mix it all together with your hands until it is completely combined and forms large crumbs
  5. spread the crumbly mixture all over the top of the apples in one thick layer
  6. bake for 30 minutes at 375 degrees

Can be served warm or cold. My favorite way to enjoy it is warm with a scoop of non-diary vanilla ice cream.

Antioxidant-Rich Chili – CSA Week 17

Autumn has arrived. The leaves are falling, the nights are cooler and I have returned to the kitchen. I love a cozy Sunday afternoon in a warm sweater and thick socks, the football game on in the background, an aromatic pot of chili bubbling away on the stove.

Not just any chili though. This chili recipe has been a long time in the making. It wasn’t until last year that I finished it’s fine-tuning. I knew my work was done when Brad, the in-house chili connoisseur, started to request it with an almost annoying frequency. (I’m telling you, the man LOVES chili).

A few unconventional ingredients pack both flavor and nutrition. Pumpkin puree provides a luxurious mouth-feel and ups the beta carotene and fiber by a mile. Unsweetened cocoa supplies a blast of antioxidant power while adding a surprising depth of flavor. A heaping scoop of chia ensures a healthy dose of calcium and the many herbs and spices double up on antioxidant power and taste. In addition to all that, this dish is full of fresh veggies and hearty legumes. It makes a wonderfully nourishing meal on a blustery fall day.

This recipe can easily be adapted for vegetarians, vegans and meat-eaters alike. As always, CSA ingredients are in bold type.

Antioxidant-Rich Chili

Antioxidant-Rich Chili

  • 2 T extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium yellow onions, diced
  • 5 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
  • 1 lb. lean, organic, grass finished beef *for vegan/vegetarian version, omit or replace with a meat substitute
  • 1 bell pepper, diced
  • 2 tsp kosher salt
  • black pepper, to taste
  • 1 scant T KC BBQ sauce
  • 1 28-oz can organic crushed tomatoes
  • 1 15-0z can organic tomato sauce
  • 1 15-oz can organic pumpkin puree ( or 2 C homemade pumpkin puree)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 heaping tsp dried oregano
  • 2 tsp chili powder
  • 2 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp corriander
  • 1/4 tsp chipotle chili (add more if you like it spicy. You could also use cayenne pepper)
  • 1 T agave nectar
  • 2 16-oz cans organic red kidney beans, drained (or 4 C cooked, dried beans)
  • 1 16-0z can organic black beans, drained (or 2 C cooked, dried beans)
  • 2 T unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 2 T chia seeds
  1. in a large dutch oven or stock pot, saute the onions with the olive oil
  2. when the onions have softened, add the garlic and ground beef and cook until browned
  3. add the bell peppers and season with 1 tsp salt and black pepper
  4. add bqq sauce and stir until peppers have softened
  5. add crushed tomatoes, tomato sauce and pumpkin
  6. add herbs and spices, agave nectar and remaining tsp salt
  7. stir in beans, cocoa and chia and simmer until flavors are melded (20-30 minutes)

Beach Plum Crazy

Beach Plum Jelly

I recently had the pleasure of attending a fabulous beach plum canning workshop with the Trustees of Reservations and Appleton Farms. Beach plums can be found growing in the wild along the coast from Maine to Virginia.

Purple Beach Plums

The shrub-like trees grow in sandy areas and produce sweet, cherry-sized fruits in purple and golden varieties.

Golden Beach Plums

Beach plums can be eaten raw, made into jams and jellies, used in baking or in cordials and liqueurs.

Beach Plum Harvest

I’m told that this year’s yield was unusually large, so we were able to pick enough fruit for the canning workshop plus some to take home.

You need a permit to pick on Trustees’ land so I’m not going to give up our harvesting location. The leaders of the workshop were really passionate about the importance of keeping sand dunes intact because they protect our beaches. If you decide to go out in search of the beach plum on your own, please respect their habitat by staying on marked trails and trying not to step on the vegetation that keeps the dunes in place.

Straining Beach Plum Juice

In the workshop, we made a delicious beach plum jelly. After boiling down the fruits, we strained out the juice and combined it with sugar and pectin. The result was tart and sweet with a distinctly “plummy” flavor.

At home with my extra fruit, I decided to try making two varieties of beach plum cordial. I couldn’t decide between a vodka-based recipe and a brandy-based one, so I tried both. We won’t know how those turned out until I take them out of their “cool dark place” in March. I’ll let you know…

I’ve got a few cups of whole beach plums stowed in the freezer to get me through until next year’s harvest. Now that I’ve had a taste, I have a feeling that beach plums are going to be a yearly tradition.

Here is a link to the recipes for beach plum cordial and beach plum jam. You can find more great beach plum recipes in Elizabeth Post Mirel’s book, Plum Crazy: A Book About Beach Plums.

Sweet and Salty Watermelon Salad – CSA Week 12

It seems that I’m a bit behind on blogging. I must admit that August was a tough month for writing CSA-focused blog posts. For one thing, the weather was gorgeously sunny but not too hot and made me want to be outside all the time. Ever tried to read a computer screen in the sun? On top of that, 90 percent of the late summer produce from the CSA has been the type that’s best enjoyed raw or very simply prepared. Deep crimson heirloom tomatoes, peppery arugula, perfectly crisp bell peppers, sugary sun-gold cherry tomatoes, bright green basil, delicately bitter cucumbers…all of these things were ending up in my belly before my mind could even begin to formulate a recipe!

I hope you all have been enjoying the lovely vegetables and fruits of August as much as I have. My return to the kitchen is guaranteed as fall ushers in crisp weather and root vegetables, but in the meantime here is a quick simple recipe that I made with the last of August’s bounty.

Salty and Sweet Watermelon Salad

Sweet and Salty Watermelon Salad

  • 6 C chopped watermelon (I used a mixture of yellow and pink…use as many colors you can get your hands on for a beautiful presentation!)
  • 1/2 C very thinly sliced Alisa Craig onions
  • 2 T finely chopped mint
  • 1/2 C sliced Kalamata olives
  • drizzle of extra virgin olive oil
  • freshly cracked black pepper
  • sea salt (optional: skip the salt and use feta cheese if you aren’t keeping it vegan)
  1. combine the watermelon, onions, mint, olives, olive oil and pepper in a large bowl
  2. just before serving, sprinkle a generous helping of crumbled feta or, for the vegan version, a scant sprinkling of  sea salt to individual portions. If you add the salt or feta too far in advance, the juices of the watermelon will be drawn out and you’ll have a soupy mess.

yellow watermelon

One-Pot Veggie & Penne Supper – CSA Week 9

One-Pot Veggie & Penne Supper

After working all day, it’s nice to have a home cooked meal, but who wants to deal with all the dishes? Even for those of us who love to cook, the thought of having to clean up the mess can send us running to the phone to order takeout. This is a healthy and hearty one-pot meal that will totally satisfy without creating a disaster in your kitchen. Bonus for using a dutch oven: it’s pretty enough to put right on the table for serving and it keeps your leftovers safely stored in the fridge. NO pot to clean after dinner!

CSA ingredients are in bold type. This dish uses a lot of them!

One-Pot Veggie & Penne Supper

  • extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 Alisa Craig onion, sliced (any onion will work)
  • 1 green pepper, chopped
  • 2 C small (about 1 inch) Red Gold potatoes, cut in half, skin on (Red Bliss will work)
  • 1 Orient Express eggplant, cubed, skin on (any kind of eggplant will work)
  • 1 C whole wheat penne pasta
  • generous handfuls of fresh basil, oregano and parsley, chopped (reserve some for serving)
  • 1 C marinara or tomato sauce
  • water
  • 4 C fresh kale, torn into bite-sized pieces
  • 1 yellow summer squash, cut into coins
  • 1/2 lb. green, yellow or purple wax beans, trimmed and cut in half
  • kosher salt
  1. heat about 1 T olive oil in a dutch oven and add the onion and green pepper
  2. once the onion and pepper begin to soften, add the potatoes and cook over medium heat until the potatoes are starting to brown a bit
  3. add the eggplant and salt generously
  4. stir while you continue to cook and brown the potatoes for about 5 minutes
  5. add the dry penne, fresh herbs and tomato sauce, stir and then add enough water to just cover the pasta
  6. add the squash, beans, and kale and season again with salt
  7. simmer over medium heat with cover on (it should be bubbling) for about 12 minutes, or until pasta is tender, stirring occasionally (add more water if it becomes too dry or cook a little longer with the lid off if it seems too wet)
  8. stir in a bit of olive oil and sprinkle with the rest of the chopped herbs before serving

One-Pot Veggie & Penne Supper

Chocolate Beet Muffins – CSA Week 8

Confession: I hate beets. To me they taste slightly sweet, somewhat slimy and very earthy. And by “earthy” I mean dirt-like. I do appreciate the nutritional value of the beetroot and I admire its beauty. It’s the taste and texture I can’t get past. For these reasons, I’ve been on a mission to come up with ways to consume, but not taste, beets.

We can all have a good laugh at my attempt at Candy Cane Beet Sundaes. That was a mess. But as promised, I have come up with a winner. Chocolate Beet Muffins probably sound a little strange but I swear they taste great.

Using the recipe analyzer at caloriecount.com, I found out that  each one of these muffins provides a whopping 17% of your daily fiber recommendation and 9% of your daily iron (based on a 2000 calorie diet). Yay beets!

Chocolate Beet Muffins

Chocolate Beet Muffins

  • 4 medium-small beets
  • 1/2 C dried, pitted dates
  • 1 1/2 C whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1 C raw sugar
  • 1/8 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp garam masala
  • 4 T unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1/2 C vegetable oil
  • 1/2 C non-dairy milk – unsweetened (I used coconut milk)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3/4 C chopped walnuts
  • 3/4 C semi-sweet chocolate chips (Trader Joe’s brand happens to be vegan)
  1. in a 350 degree oven, roast the beets (wrap whole, washed beets in tinfoil) until tender, about 1 hour
  2. once beets are cooled, peel and add to food processor
  3. add dates to food processor and process until mixture is completely smooth – you will have to scrape down the sides several times
  4.  in a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients and use a whisk to get rid of any clumps
  5. add the wet ingredients, including the beet and date puree and stir until combined
  6. fold the walnuts and chocolate chips into the batter
  7. line a 12-muffin pan with wrappers and spray each one with a little PAM
  8. divide the batter evenly between the 12 muffin wrappers
  9. bake at 350 for 25-30 minutes, until a tooth pick inserted into the center of the muffin comes out clean

roasted beetsdried, pitted datespureed dates and beetschocolate beet muffinschocolate beet muffin batter

Farm Fresh Potato Salad – CSA Week 7

My version of a great potato salad is tangy and bright with a kick of freshness and just the right amount of salt. No gloppy mayo here. This simple dish is good, clean, eatin’!2013-07-28 01.00.09

Farm Fresh Potato Salad

  • 1 1/2 lbs Red Gold potatoes, halved (could also use Red Bliss)
  • 1 Alisa Craig onion, minced (if you can’t get mild, fresh onions, use shallots)
  • 1/4 C fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1/8 C fresh chives, chopped
  • 2 T olive oil
  • 1 T whole grain mustard or spicy brown mustard
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 T apple cider vinegar
  • kosher salt and black pepper, to taste
  1. fill a large pot with 1-2 inches of water and fit with a steamer. Bring water to a boil. Place the halved potatoes along with your discared onion scraps in the steamer. Cover and steam until tender, about 12-14 minutes
  2. in a large bowl, whisk the onions and herbs together with the oil, two types of mustard, vinegar and salt and pepper
  3. add the cooked potatoes to the bowl while still hot and toss to combine
  4. serve warm or at room temp

If you prefer your potato salad more gooey, you can double the recipe for the dressing. You can also cut the potatoes smaller and/or partially mash a few chunks.

red gold potatoesred gold potatoes steamingfarm fresh potato salad dressing

Cabbage “Noodles” – CSA Week 6

Growing up, I loved when my mom made cabbage “noodles”. She would fry a little bacon in a very hot skillet and cook thinly sliced ribbons of cabbage in the bacon fat. The only seasoning required was a bit of salt and pepper. Served as a side dish with crispy crumbled bacon on top, the noodles were a buttery, decadent comfort food.

The recipe that follows is my lightened up version of mom’s recipe. Fresh sliced onions from the CSA add dimension in the bacon’s stead.

cabbage noodles

Cabbage “Noodles”

makes 2-4 servings

  • 1 mini cabbage, cored and sliced
  • 1/2 Alisa Craig onion, sliced
  • olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  1. heat the olive oil in a large skillet (cast iron works great)
  2. saute the onions over medium heat until soft
  3. turn the heat to high, add the cabbage and season with salt and pepper
  4. cook over high heat, flipping the cabbage, until browned

Candy Cane Beet Sundaes – CSA Week 5 – FAIL!

Chioggia beets, also called candy cane beets, due to their delicate concentric white and red rings, are stunning. Whether thinly shaved into salads or coarsely diced and roasted, these beauties always steal the show.

2013-07-22 06.57.33

When I saw candy cane beets in the share room, I couldn’t wait to take these marvels of nature home from the farm and get creative with them. But then I lost all ambition to cook. Yet another heat wave had hit us New-Englanders and I was having trouble getting into the kitchen.

In the oppressive heat of the afternoon last week, I was contemplating the many ways in which I could showcase the beauty of my lovely CSA Chioggias. As hard as I tried to brainstorm recipes featuring root vegetables, my mind kept wandering back to cooler things. With visions of swimming pools, industrial fans and frozen margaritas dancing in my head, I just couldn’t focus on roasting, mashing, pureeing, dicing or slicing beets.

And then it hit me.

Ice cream! Because really, when in doubt…ice cream.

I would make sundaes, starring not only the lovely candy cane beet, but also her more practical, if less showy friend, the red beet. I’d kill two beets with one sundae. A risky endeavor that sounded like a solid plan in my head, which, in retrospect, was clearly affected by the midday heat.

I spent most of Sunday morning feverishly working in the kitchen to bring to life my vision. First, I peeled and juiced a few red beets and boiled down their liquid with starlight mints, producing a shocking red, “candy cane” sauce.

red candy cane sauce

I then hauled out the ice cream maker to whip up a coconut milk based, vegan, “candy cane” ice cream.

2013-07-20 23.33.51

To the ice cream I added crushed up starlight mints and a bit of my fresh “candy cane” sauce for a red, minty swirl.

crushed starlight mints

red swirl ice cream

I even candied and crisped paper-thin candy cane beet chips for a dainty garnish.

After all that work, I was excited for my sundaes to be a total hit.

But alas, they were a total flop. The once vibrant candy cane rings on my beet chips became washed out and faded, the ice cream was waaay too sweet and the red minty swirl was more like gelatinous, semi-coagulated beet juice with subtle notes of Listerine.

I decided to share this kitchen nightmare because it proves that while it can be very rewarding to leave your comfort zone and try new things, you won’t always hit a home run. And that’s OK! For every failed recipe you’re bound to create some winners. Especially when cooking with a CSA, half the fun is in being creative…in leaving behind the cookbooks and breaking some culinary rules. A little coagulated beet juice isn’t going to stop me. A bold new beet recipe is my next project, and it’s going to be a good one!

Grilled Summer Squash Sandwich – CSA Week 5

2013-07-15 00.52.06

Throwing together a rustic sandwich for lunch makes me feel so European. Simplicity equals elegance here and good bread is a must! This delicious fresh sammy will be on the plate in 10 minutes, start to finish.

Grilled Summer Squash Sandwich

  • 1 T coconut oil (you could use olive oil but I love the nutty flavor that coconut lends)
  • 1 summer squash, cut in half and then sliced lengthwise
  • a pinch of salt
  • crusty French or Italian bread
  • olive tapenade
  • handful of fresh basil leaves2013-07-15 00.51.17
  1. in a nonstick pan, heat the coconut oil until pan is very hot
  2. add the sliced summer squash and season with a little salt
  3. brown the squash on each side – it should be tender once browned
  4. spread the tapenade on one piece of the bread, stack the summer squash and whole basil leaves on top and cover with the other slice of bread